Friday, January 29, 2010

If You Could Travel in Time...

If you could travel in time, where would you go?

As some of you know, my writing project for the past three years has revolved around Time Travel. I absolutely love the idea of time travel. It's fascinating, isn't it?

In my book I will be exploring some of my favorite periods and historical situations. But I'm curious. What are yours? Is there anything you think would be cool if I covered in my series?

Choose up to three of the choices in the poll to the right, then comment below with more details!

12 comments:

Shaylynn said...

Ancient Greece, so that all the stuff I'm reading about in school woould make sense. :P

The High Middle Ages... do I even need to explain why?

World War II has always been my favorite period of history... the stories of strength and courage in the face of persecution and death... and it is recent enough to feel like more than "legends or myths of bygone days". This is certainly my favorite era to read historical fiction about.

Carpe Guitarrem said...

I picked the medieval and WWII options. The Middle Ages are just fun and classic, and I find something particularly inspiring about the visceral heroism of World War II stories. The world has changed, but heroes still exist.

AutumnRose said...

I voted for "other" because I picked January, 1696, specifically if I were to go to Glencoe, in the Scottish Highlands. I know it is not the usual to attend such a thing as the Massacre of Glencoe, but it would mean a lot to me.

Elenatintil said...

Oh my goodness... AutumnRose, your post gives me the shivers.

Without giving away too much, a major location in this book is indeed, Glencoe, owned by a MacDonald. I hadn't intended to actually go back in time to the Massacre, but perhaps I'll think about it.

This is just scary.

Erin said...

the night the angels came and told the shepherds about Jesus's birth.

R. A. said...

I'd want to visit the Pre-Raphaelites in Victorian England. Hang out with Christina Rossetti and the brotherhood and get myself in a painting. I'd really love to meet William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones too. :)

Angel_Horses said...

I voted the Middle Ages (need I even say why??, Jane Austen era, and other--which would be England while Chesterton and Tolkien and Lewis were alive.

AutumnRose said...

Whoa! Elena! I just checked these comments, and I'm rather amazed by what you say. I've rarely met anyone who knows at all about Glencoe, let alone the Massacre, and still less who thought of setting part of a book there. That is very... neat. My ancestors were survivors of Glencoe, so it's always been rather clsoe to my heart, and I've done quite a deal of research into it.

What you've said is very exciting to me. :)

Elenatintil said...

Hey Autumn Rose -

Seriously? Do you have any notes or obsure facts that you could share? It can be rather tricky to get Scottish information without doing a lot of digging (as I'm sure you know!)

AutumnRose said...

Oh, definitely. It's tricky to find material about the Massacre that goes deeper than "The Campbells and MacDonalds had a feud, and one night the Campbells killed the MacDonalds." One thing that I find very interesting is that the blame does not rest on the shoulders of the Campbells themselves so much as on government officials, who seem to have feared a Jacobite uprising. This was actuall ythe subject of a major research paper I did for my History of Western Civ. course last year, so I've been pretty well steeped in the details. :) Two really excellent books it used a lot in the course of writing it were "Glencoe: The Story of the Massacre" by John Prebble, which goes quite in depth and has lots of fun, quirky little details like the old MacDonald tradition that if, for some reason, you had to leave the room during a party, when you returned you had to apologize for your absence in rhyme, or else be denied the privilege of drinking any more. :) It's not an overly long book, but you do need to have a bit of time on your hands to read it. If you're looking for a shorter read, I really liked Magnus Linklater's "The Story of the Massacre of Glencoe". My essay was peppered with footnotes sourcing him, since it was easy to quickly find all the details I needed.

Valia said...

Okay, I've never commented before, but when I saw the talk about the Glencoe Massacre I had to pop in.

*notes down AutumnRose's book recommendations* I definitely want to find out more, as most of what I know comes from little bits here and there in historical site info and from what my dad's told me. I wish I could say I had a really neat connection like your's, AutumnRose, but, alas, my interest was only piqued by my dad telling us about it as we drove past Glencoe (which is still nice, but not the same). Am I remembering right that the MacDonalds had been very late getting some sort of allegiance papers in and the Campbells were sent to collect them? *will have to look up and recall who was ruling then*
(Oooh, uni library has the latter book! No sign of the Prebble book, but it came up with a few other of his' that I shall have to look into...Tay Bridge Disaster...)
*fervently hopes that Elena does not mind the slight 'hi-jacking' of her comment thread*

'Hem. At any rate, I believe I am supposed to say what I voted for? Hard choice, but I suppose Renaissance/Reformation (mainly the 'Second' Reformation in Scotland), WWII (I think it would just be a fascinating time to visit), and Other (Scotland and/or Ireland when Christianity was first coming in).

Elenatintil said...

I don't mind, as long as you're on topic! More comments means more people are reading my blog, so it's all good in my book! And I'm excited to see that there's an interest in Glencoe! :)